Launch Date of EPPP Step 2 Changed to January 2020

 

 

The ASPPB has changed the launch date of the EPPP Step 2 to January 2020.

The EPPP Step 2, which is intended to complement the existing EPPP through assessing competency and skills, was previously being planned for a January 2019 launch. By pushing the date forward by a year, the ASPPB has more time to develop the new exam to the same standards as the existing EPPP.

This means that those licensed prior to 2020 will not be required to take the EPPP2.

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The Secrets Behind TSM’s 94% First-time Pass Rate

In a live broadcast on July 27th, Dr. Graham Taylor gave an overview of TSM’s program and explained some of the reasons our learning platform has been able to achieve a 94% first-time pass rate. Dr. Taylor shared his own story of how the pressures of needing to pass the EPPP with only a month to study forced him to take a step back to analyze how the human brain works, and also to study how various theories of memory and learning can be incorporated into the learning process. The result was a paradigm shift in the learning process which is responsible for TSM 94% first-time pass rate.

Dr. Graham Taylor Gives Overview of the EPPP

What is the EPPP? Why is licensure important? What requirements does a candidate have to meet before they can apply to take the psychology licensing exam? Dr. Graham Taylor addressed all these questions in a Facebook Live event earlier this month. In his broadcast, which can be watched below, Dr. Taylor gave an overview of the EPPP, explained what content areas a person should expect to see on the EPPP and how the percentages in these content areas are changing as of February 2018.

Can You Trust Your Memory During the EPPP Exam?

Memorization is part of EPPP exam preparation. How reliable is your memory, though?

Psychologist Dr. Julia Shaw says we are essentially creating our own fictional past every time we think back on a personal memory. She says “It’s such a terrifying but beautiful notion that every day you wake up with a slightly different personal past.” Her research even leans in to how the unreliability of memory has impacted our criminal justice system.

While memorizing facts for the EPPP exam is a reliable use of memory, we are all constantly creating false personal memories. Dr. Shaw says in her blog post, How False Memory Changes What Happened Yesterday, “The question isn’t whether our memories are false, it’s how false are our memories.” Every day we recreate our memories, “if ever so slightly.”

False memories are “recollections of things that you never actually experienced.” Whether they be minor memory errors, “such as thinking you saw a yield sign when you actually saw a stop sign” or grander errors “like thinking you took a hot air balloon ride that never actually happened,” everyone has a memory that is not 100% trustworthy.

Can this affect your EPPP exam score? Continue reading

Seven Steps to Creating an EPPP Study Schedule

 

In the world of EPPP test preparation, there’s a familiar story. It goes something like this.

You finished your graduate work, you completed your internship and now you’re all ready to do what you’ve always dreamed of doing—helping people through your work as a psychologist. There’s only one problem: you haven’t passed your licensure exam. Compared to the rigors of grad school and the stress of internship, this final hurdle seems comparatively easy. So you order a box of books and other preparation materials that promise to train you for everything you need to know to successfully pass the EPPP and get licensed. The box of preparation materials arrives. Not wanting to waste a moment and delay your longed-for career, you jump right in and start studying. As you get into the material, it quickly becomes clear that the task is more daunting than you anticipated. You feel overwhelmed, and with good reason: after all, the EPPP is like the bar exam or a medical exam—one of the hardest tests among all the professional disciplines.

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Use the Right Mindset to Pass the EPPP

Whether you are a confident genius or an anxious test taker, your mind is either working for you or against you, especially when it comes to your ability to pass the EPPP.

Maybe your entire life you’ve been told that you’re a genius who will succeed at anything. Perhaps school came easily to you and you acknowledged your stroke of genius for many successes. If you think this is a positive mindset which will help you pass the EPPP, you’re wrong.

On the other hand, maybe you’ve been told your entire life that you’re almost good enough but not quite. Perhaps school was full of failing grades but you excused yourself from trying harder because you just weren’t good enough anyway. If you think is a negative mindset which will hinder your EPPP score, you’re onto something.

The point is that, in these scenarios, the mind is working against both the genius and the failure.

So, what is the right mindset to pass the EPPP?

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Interview with Carol Dweck

Why do some people reach their potential while others, who are equally as capable and talented, do not?

Sarah Green, of Harvard Business Review, interviews Stanford psychologist and author, Carol Dweck, about her expertise on the growth mindset. Green and Dweck discuss the conundrum of losing a growth mindset when you achieved leadership as well as why some achieve success while others don’t.

See the full interview here.

Could Digital Addiction be Affecting Your EPPP Score?      

You might be quick to think: Addiction? Not me! There’s no WAY my smartphone is impacting my chances for a passing EPPP score! But, because nothing should stand in your way of a passing EPPP score, let’s look at what constitutes addiction if to at least rule it out.

The Merriam-Webster online dictionary defines addiction as a:

“compulsive need for and use of a habit-forming substance (such as heroin, nicotine, or alcohol) characterized by tolerance and by well-defined physiological symptoms upon withdrawal; broadly: persistent compulsive use of a substance known by the user to be harmful.”

Though a smartphone is not a consumable substance such as the drugs listed in the Merriam-Webster definition, the use of it can be persistent compulsive – even when use is known to be harmful. Continue reading

How to Overcome Test Anxiety with help from the Russian Special Forces

It’s not what you think.  While the difficulty of Special Forces training around the world is known to be extreme, especially among the few who have actually endured it, what the Russian Spetsnaz goes through is on another level.

The stresses that such rigors impose upon those undergoing it would also likely be unbearable for them were it not for the psychological tools they are provided with to help them cope.

Where do these tools come from?  They are found within the Russian Martial Art simply known as the “System” or Systema in Russian.  While its core skills and training methods are believed to be about eleven hundred years old, it was scientifically refined into its current form in the later half of the twentieth century by Soviet researchers and engineers (think Ivan Drago’s trainers in Rocky IV).

However, the communist government restricted its knowledge and practice to only its most capable forces within the Spetznaz and KGB.  It was not until the fall of Communism that this secretive system was revealed to anyone outside of these elite units.

 

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Six Thinking Errors and How to Avoid Them

Research shows that much of what we experience in life is fundamentally ambiguous and open to a variety of interpretations. (For more about that, see our earlier article, ‘Gratitude as a Way of Seeing.’) One of the ways we make sense of life’s circumstances is by the meanings we ascribe to those circumstances. The problem arises when we impose negative meanings onto our experiences that are based on a distorted view of reality.

Psychologists who have studied human thought and communication have identified some common distortions or “thinking errors” that cause many people negatively to frame their experiences. There are many lists of these thinking errors on the internet, but below are ones I have identified as being the most common and relevant to everyday life.

 

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