TSM What is the EPPP?

Are you thinking about embarking on the journey of passing the EPPP? Or perhaps you’re already immersed in your EPPP study schedule. Either way, it is helpful to know the components of the EPPP and where it all began.

The Examination for the Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP) was first administered in 1965. It was developed by the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB) to assist in the evaluation of psychology applicants by granting eligibility through licensure. Successful completion of the exam grants candidates license eligibility to practice psychology in the United States and Canada.

The EPPP is intended to cover the knowledge that is determined foundational for competency in the practice of psychology. It has questions in approximately eight topics:

1.Biological bases of behavior
2. Cognitive-affective bases of behavior
3. Social and cultural bases of behavior
4. Growth and lifespan development
5. Assessment and diagnosis of patients
6. Treatment, intervention, prevention, and supervision of patients
7. Research methods and statistics
8.Ethical, legal, and professional issues

The EPPP consists of 225 multiple choice questions to be answered in a span of four hours and fifteen minutes. 175 of the questions are scored while 50 remain unscored. Each multiple-choice question has four answers to choose from with one being the fully accurate choice. An EPPP score is given on a scale from 200 to 800 based on the total number of correct responses with no penalty given for incorrect answers. A candidate’s raw score is scaled to consider question difficulty which ensures that all tests can be compared equally.

Although licensing authorities in the United States and Canada are responsible for setting their own benchmarks regarding passing scores, more than 90% use a passing score of 500 which is the ASPPB recommendation. The Taylor Study Method is designed to guarantee your passing score on the first attempt regardless of licensing authority benchmarks.

Currently, the EPPP is administered in more than 275 Pearson VUE test centers across the United States and Canada. It is the second to last step in becoming a licensed psychologist followed by individual provincial and state boards. To become eligible to take the EPPP, one must take several steps such as graduation with a PhD or PsyD in Psychology from an accredited school, successful completion of supervised clinical experience, as well as state or province-specific requirements.

In March of 2017, the ASPPB announced the approval of a plan to develop an additional exam to complement the current EPPP. Named “EPPP Step 2,” it will focus on competency and asses a candidate’s therapy skills integrated with use of knowledge skills, attitudes, and values in psychology. EPPP Step 1 will continue to test knowledge. The launch date of EPPP Step 2 is set for January 2020.

If you’re unsure about the qualifiers in your state or province or if you have questions about EPPP Step 2 and how to get started on studying, give TSM a call. We can set you on the path towards success. Call us at 1-877-510-5445 or email us at contactus@taylorstudymethod.com

What to Do When the Internship Is Over   

So, you’ve completed, or are about to complete, your internship. What’s next?

Unlike graduate school, or the internship itself, there is no guided process of how to proceed after the internship. Lucky for you, we have provided 10 steps to take after your internship with advice from the American Psychological Association (APA).

  1. Know the requirements.

What does your state require for licensure? Typically, you would earn your degree, complete supervised internships and postdoc hours, and pass the EPPP. From there, you would take your state’s jurisprudence or ethics exam and, if your state has one, an oral exam.

Some states allow you to sit for the EPPP directly following internship hours. Other states, however, have different requirements. At Taylor Study Method, we can provide you with your state’s specific requirements so you do not have to guess. Email us at memberssupport@taylorstudymethod.com or call us at 877-510-5445.

  1. Make a study plan.

Decide when you want to take the exam and form a study schedule around that. It typically takes about 3 to 4 months to study for the EPPP. At TSM, we can help you formulate a study schedule that suits your time frame.

See our expert tips on creating a study schedule here.

  1. Know where you want to practice.

Do you live close to the border of another state? Or have you always dreamed of living across the country someday? Learn the licensing requirements of where you might want to practice psychology someday.

Once again, TSM can provide you with state-specific requirements.

  1. Talk with the licensing board.

Although TSM can provide you with state-specific requirements, the APA suggests visiting the licensing board websites of the states you are interested in. Ask them questions until you fully understand the steps toward licensure and stay up to date on any state regulations.

  1. Plan your postdoc, if applicable.

Ask us at TSM to see if a postdoc experience is right for you because some states do not require it. If you do pursue postdoc, look for an experience that meets your state’s licensing requirements and one that will, per the APA, “enhance your knowledge and facilitate long-term career goals.” You can either continue at your internship site or find a new site that peaks your interest.

Before you begin your postdoc, the APA advises creating a contract that outlines your state’s licensing requirements and how the site, supervisor, and you will meet those requirements.

  1. Apply with the state board.

Once your prerequisites are met, request an application from the State Board of Psychology (SBP), fill out the application, and return it. TSM can assist you in this process. Once the SBP approves your application, you are ready to book your EPPP spot.

  1. Apply with Pearson VUE.

Upon SBP approval, submit your application to Pearson VUE, which is the company that administers the EPPP.

Before you take this step, however, consider this: Once your fees are paid to Pearson, you must take the EPPP within 90 days. Therefore, you should be close to finishing studying and confident in your exam prep when you apply.

  1. Take the EPPP.

If you use TSM to prepare for the EPPP, you will be able to sit for the exam with confidence. We will assure you of your readiness based on your practice test scores, which are a regular feature of our study model.

All the work will be worth it when you pass the EPPP. And when you do pass, submit your results to the SBP.

  1. Sit for jurisprudence.

Once you pass the EPPP and submit your results, it is time to sit your state’s Jurisprudence Exam (if applicable), which covers state-specific regulations and mental health laws. Upon passing this exam, you are ready to be a licensed psychologist.

  1. Keep a record.

After all that hard work, the APA suggests storing your credentials into a credentials bank. For a small fee, you can locate your data in one place, such as the National Register or ASPPB Credentials Bank. You can store documents such as transcripts, your EPPP and jurisprudence scores, recommendation letters, proof of internship and postdoc hours, as well as state licensure forms.

We invite you to see how the Taylor Study Method can support you as you prepare to pass the EPPP. Become a member for free at www.taylorstudymethod.com/free-account. For more information, call us at 877-510-5445.

Further Reading

Time Management on EPPP Test Day

When exam day comes, you will succeed by having thorough content knowledge and by being a strategic test taker. Come test day, all you should have to worry about is choosing the correct answers in the allotted time frame.

To be sure time doesn’t run out before you answer all the questions, we have some strategic tips on managing your time on EPPP test day.

Time management on test day starts 2 days before your EPPP when you’re getting your most important night’s sleep. The night before the exam you might be restless so it is important to sleep well two nights before your exam.

The night before your exam, prepare by packing necessities such as a snack and mandatory items for your exam, like your identification and PES information. Lay out your clothing the night before and be sure to choose layered clothing as you won’t know whether the testing center will be cold or hot.

You will need to arrive to the testing center a half an hour before your scheduled test time, so give yourself plenty of time the morning of to eat, get dressed, and drive there in a leisurely way as to avoid anxiety. Allow time for traffic and potential unintended travel mishaps.

When you get to the testing center, avoid test anxiety by minimizing conversation with other test takers and silently reminding yourself that you are going to do well. Tell yourself “Today is the day I will pass the EPPP!”

When it comes to time management on the actual exam, here’s the strategy we recommend at TSM.

You will have approximately 68 seconds per question within the allotted 4 hours and 15 minutes of exam time consisting of 225 questions total (175 scored and 50 pretest questions that are unscored). In the first 10-15 minutes of your exam, do what we call an “Information Dump.” Write out everything you’ve kept in your memory. This will give you the freedom to focus during your test because you can return to these notes when related questions come up. Although testing centers may not allow scratch paper, they can provide a white board upon request.

As you move through your exam, do not forget to take breaks. Dr. Graham Taylor goes over specific break strategies towards the end of his broadcast here.  Do not simply work until you feel tired and take a break then. Instead, plan breaks and take them to stay fresh and focused. There are two types of breaks you should decide ahead of time to take: mini breaks (3-5 minute) and full breaks (10 minutes).

If you decide to take mini breaks, choose one of two strategies. Either decide on a certain number of questions to complete before a break is taken (e.g., 25 questions), or decide on a period of time spent working (e.g., 25 minutes) before a break is taken. During these breaks, stand up, stretch, move, and breathe.

If you decide to take full breaks, take them after an hour and a half of work.  During these breaks, grab some fuel and food, use the restroom if you need to, stretch, and breathe.

Regardless of what you decide, take the breaks even if you feel like you don’t need to in the moment. Taking planned breaks will allow you to work from rest and stay fresh and focused as opposed to working hard for rest.

Lastly, take a deep breath before each question. Breathe in slowly through your nose, hold for a count of two, and then slowly exhale out of your mouth. While breathing, remind yourself that you can do this!

Time management on test day is all about coming in with a strategy. Develop your strategy and get accustomed to time management during practice tests then prepare as much as you can in the days leading up to your exam.

 

Further Reading:

The Best Way to Approach an EPPP Practice Test

TSM practice testsWhat are your EPPP practice test scores telling you? Among many benefits of EPPP practice tests, a score can reflect how well you understand the material. And how you approach EPPP practice tests can affect your overall exam success.

So, how do you know if you’ve got the right approach?

First, check your mindset. What do you think of and how do you feel about the EPPP? If you identify any negative thoughts or feelings towards your exam, consider this: Negativity creates toxins in your brain. Those toxins can cause anxiety and stress, which are the last things you need when studying for such an important exam.

Adopt the right mindset toward the EPPP with gratitude. Gratitude is a huge factor in having a good study experience as well as a passing score. Start by noticing your negative thoughts and then you can begin replacing them with thankfulness.

The next step towards the correct EPPP practice test approach is to understand the benefit of practice tests. Not only are they a reflection of your content knowledge, but test-taking has been proven to improve learning. Practice tests, therefore, not only gauge how well you know the content, but they are a great way of studying.

At TSM, our practice test method is designed to optimize this phenomenon of learning through test-taking. Our method allows your brain to construct the information into your memory and retrieve information during the actual exam.

Practice tests also reduce test anxiety on exam day. Anxiety can negatively affect our ability to perform, which then creates more anxiety, ultimately creating a cycle. A great way to combat test anxiety is to take practice exams. As you get closer to your exam date, begin mimicking the test-taking environment. Study in a quieter space and go through the questions with the same time constraints and breaks. The more prepared you are, the more comfortable and at ease you will be on exam day.

Though EPPP practice tests are vital to your memory and retention, they should not be used as a substitute for content mastery. This leads us to our next and final step.

The third step towards the correct EPPP practice test approach is to understand that, contrary to popular belief, the ability to answer questions correctly on practice tests is not always equivalent to content mastery. Since the practice test questions are different from what you will encounter on the actual exam, answering correctly on the practice test is only valuable if you understand the content behind the question. EPPP exam success is a combination of being a practiced test-taker and having a thorough understanding of the content.

The quality of your studying should be reflected in how well you understand the material as evidenced by your practice exam score. So, how well should you be doing on your practice exams? Within about a month or two of studying, you should see a noticeable improvement in your scoring. If you’re not seeing an improvement, it’s possible you are studying inefficiently.

But before you dive back into the study materials and retake the same practice test, study in a way that helps the material make sense to you. For example, instead of studying a domain beginning to end, take a problem concept with you into your study material and dive into that specific concept. Once you have those concepts mastered, you can take another practice exam. If there is still no noticeable improvement, you may have to reassess how you are studying.

Ultimately, you should approach EPPP practice tests with a good mindset, an understanding of the benefits, and a thorough knowledge of the content behind the questions. At Taylor Study Method, we help you formulate a study process and equip you with the best tools to pass the EPPP.

 

Further Reading

3 Myths About Test Anxiety

6 Steps to EPPP Success

Use Gratitude to Detox Your Brain

Gratitude as a Way of Seeing

The Question that Will Help You Pass the EPPP

6 Things to Know Before You Begin Studying for the EPPP

6 Tips Before You Begin Studying TSM

If you’re thinking about taking the EPPP, you’ve already come a long way in your journey to licensure. The EPPP is the last step toward the prize that is almost yours.

Before you being studying for the EPPP, there are 6 things you should do, especially if you want to pass on the first attempt.

1. Fully Commit.

Dr. Graham Taylor says that if you’re going to commit, do it fully. Plan to pass on the first attempt and set a goal for a specific passing score, not just to pass in general.

To commit fully will involve making lifestyle modifications to create room for dedicated EPPP study. Don’t start studying until you’re ready to make it a priority.

2. Set a Date.

When you’re ready to make the EPPP a priority, set a date for your exam. Creating a deadline will give you a tangible goal and an accurate timeline for studying. From there, you can create a realistic study schedule and truly dedicate your time to achieving your goal.

3. Tell Your Family and Friends.

Tell the people closest to you that you are preparing to take the EPPP. Invite them to gently hold you accountable to your goal and be specific with ways they can help you. Inviting those you care about along this journey will provide you with a support system and help you combat isolation as you dedicate much of your time to studying. Your close friends and family can act as motivators when you’re struggling or in need a day off.

4. Gather Materials.

When you use Taylor Study Method, you will take an initial assessment exam. Based on your strengths and weaknesses, TSM will tailor your exam process. Then, you can utilize the tools that work best for you. TSM’s tools are designed to suit your learning style and content strengths and weaknesses. We will point you to what materials you need based on those factors.

5. Develop a Study Schedule.

You determine how many hours a week you want to study and when your exam date is. Then, TSM will help you design a study schedule around that. Dr. Taylor has great advice on creating your study schedule as well as 7 general principles to guide you.

6. Go For It!

It’s time to begin! Check out more of TSM’s unique features here!

 

Further Reading

Make 2018 Your Year to Pass the EPPP

Attention all psychology candidates!

There are a number of good reasons why you should make 2018 your year to pass the EPPP. In a
live interview yesterday with Robin Phillips, Dr. Graham Taylor discussed the significance of
2018 and the various reasons why it would be prudent to aim for passing the psychology
licensing exam this year.

During the interview, Dr. Graham Taylor spoke about decay theory, upcoming changes to the
EPPP, procrastination, and much more. You can watch the entire interview below:

Multitasking and EPPP Exam Prep

Earlier this year in a couple live broadcasts, Dr. Graham Taylor answered questions about multitasking and EPPP exam prep. His two-part series explored some of the common challenges people face when trying to navigate their EPPP preparation around other commitments like family, a job, and internships, and how to effectively overcome these challenges. In the second video, Dr. Taylor considered the dark side of multitasking and shared some research showing that the more you multitask, the worse you become at it.

5 Ways to Overcome the Winter Blues and Ace the EPPP

If you tend to feel down when winter rolls around, it can be hard to focus on studying for the EPPP. While the holidays are typically known as a cheerful time of year, they can unfortunately be characterized for some by a feeling of heaviness and of being weighed down. Decreased daylight and increased time indoors can contribute to anxiety and depression that many associate with the winter season.

According to Counseling Today, about 5% of adults in the United States experience what is called seasonal affective disorder or, fittingly so, SAD. It classifies as “major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern.” The shorter daylight hours throw off the circadian rhythm leading to a chemical imbalance in the brain. Symptoms are like that of depression such as decreased interest in activities you normally enjoy, difficulty getting out of bed, oversleeping, physical aches and pains, and fatigue. What sets SAD apart from depression is the pattern of symptoms in that they typically appear after daylight savings time.

Here are five tips to beat the winter blues, and stay focused on studying for the EPPP.

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6 Steps to EPPP Success

“Not even the rigors of grad school and internship prepared me for what I face now studying to pass the EPPP.”

“I keep putting off my EPPP test preparation because it overwhelms me. I know I need to start but I don’t know where to begin.”

“My entire career has been put on hold until I pass the EPPP. The problem is that I’ve already failed once.”

“I tried to start preparing for the EPPP once before, going through hundreds and hundreds of practice questions. It only showed me how unprepared I actually was. I know I need to put together a study plan but I don’t know where to start. I feel overwhelmed with the amount of material I need to learn.”

Do any of the above concerns sound familiar? These types of anxieties represent typical feelings among those who are aspiring to become licensed psychologists.

Through almost two decades of working to prepare students to pass the Examination for the Professional Practice of Psychology (EPPP), I’ve listened to anxieties such as those represented above. In the process of my work, I’ve collected the following tips and coping strategies that have proven effective in helping psychology students overcome these types of fears and steer a course toward EPPP success.
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